Tag Archives: Christmas Wall hanging

Crazy Christmas Fairies

25 May

Having taken delivery of the Loralie Very Fairy Christmas fabric I just had to make something from it. This is what I came up with.

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I started with a square of batting and a panel from the Loralie Very Fairy Christmas panel.

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Cut strips of matching fabrics and stitch in a crazy patch.

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That gives you this.

DSCN3110And this.

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This is what the back looks like.

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I could have stitched through a backing layer as well if I had wanted the quilting to show on the finished back. However, I cut squares to fit and pinned them on the back.

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To join the blocks together I used quilt as you go (QAYG). I cut 1.25″ strips of sashing for the front and also to match the back. I stitched the sashing strip right sides together on the front.

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At the same time I stitched the strip to match the backing to the back.

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I then attached the next block right sides together on the front only.

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The back looks like this.

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Pin the strip over the seam folding in the seam allowance.

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This can be hand sewn or stitched with a straight, zigzag or fancy stitch either from the back or the front.

DSCN3126I also followed  the same process to attach the borders forming the thin strip between main section and border.

Binding consists of a 2.5″ strip folded in two and stitched either from back or front. I did it from the front.

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This was folded over and hand stitched to the back. It could have been stitched to the back, folded to the front and machine stitched.

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This won’t get the baby a new bonnet.

I am supposed to be tracing pattern pieces on Adobe Illustrator but unfortunately the ability to do that sort of thing left me along with the ability to understand the instructions for flat pack furniture in about 1985. Luckily I don’t like flat pack furniture but I do have to trace the patterns so I guess that needs to be the next project. Perhaps I should get a sandwich board and try a quid pro quo. With my luck I’d get a house full of furniture and still be without the tracings.

Ramblings apart. If you want to do crazy patch this should give you some idea. There are some more detailed blocks in the Tips and Tricks section – Crazy For Butterflies.

 

 

Monkey Puzzle Solved and the End of Christmas.

18 Jun

Just an update on the projects featured in the last post.

And  this one.

I had completed the alphabet monkeys for what was going to be a cot quilt. I obviously took my eye off the ball and having put it together with a set of 25 patch blocks, realised that it was a bit on the long and thin size. The only way to proceed was to make it into a full sized quilt for a single bed.

This I did.

DSCN2598_450x600Some Detail.

DSCN2605_600x600   Yet More.DSCN2607_600x600

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Not my usual colours but I think they work quite well.

At the same time I was finishing ‘Chrissie Down Under’ by McKenna Ryan.

I can’t say I am as thrilled as I hoped by the completed wall hanging but at least it is finished.

I think my conclusion is that she does animals and birds very well but the Santa and the Cat don’t quite work. The problem with her patterns is that it is not easy to find a large picture of the finished quilt to see what it will look like.

I did use satin stitch round all the appliques rather than the suggested straight stitching with a poly filament thread. At least I can wash it without it falling apart.Mind you my all singing and dancing newer Pfaff refused to have anything to do with the multiple layers of fabric and glue. Whilst it was sulking I dug out my original Pfaff bought in 1985 and I have to say that it is far superior to the one I bought to replace it when the motor gave up. Nothing to do with the fact the original was made in Germany of course. (sarcy face emoticon) Luckily I decided that the small amount of money I was going to be charged to have a new motor fitted was worth it so I now have my old machine back and this quilt was able to be completed. What I will do with it I am not sure. We may have to move house to get higher ceilings.

DSCN2591_450x600 I love the detail on these birds.

DSCN2592_600x286Fiddly but worth it.

DSCN2593_600x306These may be my favourites.

DSCN2594_600x397This bird presented the biggest challenge with its layers of feathers.

DSCN2595_559x600See the detail.

DSCN2596_252x600Kangaroos and pelicans.

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As I sit posting this I can hear music from the village green. Every year Polperro has a music festival so every afternoon there are a couple of bands performing and then lots more in all the pubs in the evening. The Big Cheese and myself even took in a spot of chamber music on Sunday.

Bow Acquires Colourful New String.

30 Jan

As if I didn’t have enough  hobbies and hobbies in abeyance I have started down the road to bancruptcy with yet another. I bought some rather beautiful hand dyed fabrics at two separate quilt shows. They are fantastic for applique as each piece of fabric can yield hundreds of variations of colour and texture  rather than having one overall  pattern or colour.

Although I have several, I got to thinking how useful it would be to have  variations of variations ad infinitum. The rest, as they say is history. I had a bit of an expensive hicccup at the beginning, choosing the wrong type of fabric but even that wasn’t a disaster, just a teaching aid.

My first mistake was to believe the wording on a fabric supplier’s site that stated that it’s RFD (ready for dyeing) fabric was the best it had ever seen. On the strength of that I bought a quantity. I would probably have been happy with the results if I hadn’t had the hand dyed fabric I had bought at the shows with which to compare it. The colours were bright but the finish on the fabric was letting them down. They looked dull when I wanted vibrant.

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Over Christmas myself and Daughters numbers one and two did quite a bit of dyeing of fabrics but we were definitely underwhelmed with the results. I searched the internet to find out how other people tackled the problem. and found several answers and a reasonable consensus on the best way to go about things.

First of all I discovered that mercerised cotton is a better way to go. The treatment of the fabric means that the surface is less hairy and the  fibres absorb the dye better, thus providing the required vibrancy.

I also discovered that it appears that keeping the dye bath warm for as long as possible gives better results. For someone who works from a cellar that is decidedly nippy at this time of year this could be regarded as essential information.

The picture below was taken in said cellar and still you can see the difference.

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The other thing that became apparent was that the way the fabric dyes also varies with the different fabric/methods. There is less of a flat colour with the mercerised cotton. See how the pattern is varied on the bigger sample below.

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To an applique addict this type of fabric is the answer to so many problems.

I used the first fabrics I dyed to finish off my latest design. It is actually a Christmas wall hanging so it’s a bit late or a bit early depending how you view it. The design is actually from daughter number one and interpreted by yours truly.  I am particularly pleased with the fabric I used for Rudolph. It wasn’t planned but turned out to be perfect.

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First the elf that has lost his clothes and the friend that thinks it is hilarious.

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Not quite fiddling whilst Rome burns but something equally dangerous.

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Seasoning greetings.

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Above an inebriated Rudolph.

Below it doesn’t pay to sleep with idle hands in the vicinity.

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At the moment I am working on some clowns using the more vibrant mercerised cotton. I will post pictures to show the difference. I will also do a tutorial based on the things I have learned. Watch this space.